Should You Separate Your Blog from Your Website?

Posted by on Aug 2, 2013 | 69 comments

You have a brilliant, customer-focused company website (or you soon will).  You have an insightful, passion-infused blog (or you soon will).  And you have an important choice to make (or you soon will):

Should you separate your blog from your website? Or would they be happier together?

 

Separate blog from company website

Blog Options

Let’s say your main company website is www.abcinc.com.

  • Integrating your blog with your website means the blog appears either at www.abcinc.com/blog (subfolder) or at blog.abcinc.com (subdomain).
    (Of these, the subfolder option is better.)
  • Keeping your blog separate from your website means hosting it at www.xyzblog.com.

Is it better to keep your blog separate from your company website?

The short answer is…

No… most likely.  Don’t separate them.  Here’s why.

Advantages of integrating your blog

Integrating your blog brings a number of significant benefits that, for most companies, provide more than enough reason to choose integration.

I. Visitor benefits

  • A (well-written) blog is a great way for visitors to get to know your company because it showcases your more relateable human side.
  • Many website visitors today expect to find a company blog on your website and would be disappointed if they don’t.
  • An integrated blog creates a more seamless visitor experience.

II. SEO (Search Engine Optimization) benefits

  • All backlinks to blog posts will contribute directly to your website’s overall SEO strength because those backlinks are pointing to your main domain.  This helps all of your company website pages rank higher in search results.
  • Simply having more content pages on your site will also help the entire site rank better because Google loves content-rich authority sites.

III. Company benefits

  • Having a blog on your company website helps position you as a thought leader, not just a provider of services or products.
  • Visitors who find your blog post will already be on your company website, that much closer to taking whatever conversion action you are targeting (email opt-in, content download, purchase, etc.).
  • It’s easier and cheaper to build and maintain a single website.
  • It’s easier and cheaper to establish and promote a single brand.

Integrated Blog Example

To see a highly effective example of this type of blog, check out www.moz.com, which provides some of my favorite SEO and marketing tools.

The company blogs are featured prominently in the main site navigation.  Visit the blog page and you’ll see a ton of well-written, well-organized incredibly helpful blog posts spanning all aspects of internet marketing. Many posts are from guest bloggers.

Rarely do these posts directly promote company products.  Rather, they have served to firmly establish MOZ.com as a thought leader in this space. This leadership attracts readers in droves. It also attracts backlinks, which boosts the overall SEO authority of MOZ.com.

Advantages of keeping a separate blog

With all these integration advantages, why might you instead choose to keep your blog separate?  Here are some justifiable reasons:

  • If you want a scope that isn’t highly relevant to your company’s main offerings.
  • If you want a “tone” that isn’t appropriate for your company’s main site.
  • If you want to promote your blog as its own brand.
  • If you want to promote yourself as a more objective industry expert.
  • If you might want to someday sell the blog but keep the company website.
  • If you might want to someday leave or sell the company but keep the blog.

Separated Blog Example

To see a highly effective example of this type of blog, check out www.quicksprout.com, which is written by Neil Patel, one of my favorite bloggers.

Neil founded CrazyEgg.com and KissMetrics.com, and he also runs his own consulting practice. His blog posts often reference these other businesses and help drive traffic to them.

But the primary purpose of his QuickSprout blog has been to establish himself as a renowned industry expert, which he has achieved in spades.

What about SEO?

Note the glaring lack of SEO (Search Engine Optimization) reasons for keeping a separate blog.  This is because if your goal is to boost your main website’s SEO authority, the best way to do so is with an integrated blog.

That didn’t used to be the case.  In the old days (2+ years ago), you could build any number of separate web sites, point most of their links at your main website, and successfully inflate your main website’s SEO authority and Google search rankings.

Not any more.

For obvious reasons, Google doesn’t like artificial link building.  It doesn’t well serve Google’s customers, who want to see the best, most relevant websites, not the websites that SEO “experts” manipulate into the rankings.

And so Google has clamped down in a variety of ways.  Google is much better at recognizing and discounting such website linking schemes, which have different characteristics than natural linking that occurs from true 3rd party sites.  Google also gives much less value for multiple links from the same site.  And Google gives much less value for links from low-value sites.

In other words, getting a single link each from a handful of trusted 3rd party authority sites will be more valuable to your website’s SEO strength than getting hundreds or even thousands of links from low-value sites.

Yes, you could work to build quality backlinks to your blog website so that its links, in turn, pass more value to your main website, but you’re still using an unnecessary middle man.  If the blog is part of your main website, then those backlinks that it attracts will automatically and more directly help the SEO value of your main website.

What about keyword focus?  Can’t a separate blog website achieve better Google rankings and more search traffic because you can optimize everything, including the domain name, for a valuable keyword?

Yes and no.  Exact-match and partial-match domain names still provide some ranking value.  However, you’re neglecting to consider the very substantial additional ranking boost your blog posts will receive simply by existing on your main company website rather than on a separate lower-authority blog site.

And your ultimate goal is to have your company website found, not just the blog website, right?

Bottom line:  If your company website is your main focus, any SEO-building efforts will be more effective when your blog is part of your company website.

Is there a middle ground?

Sure.  If you’re still undecided, you can compromise by hosting your blog at a separate domain but including a prominent link to your blog from the main navigation of your company website.

This approach provides most of the visitor benefits described above — They can easily find your blog and get to know your company better.  The tradeoff is that you lose all the potential benefits of having a truly separated blog other than the ability to easily detach it from the company website later.

Conclusion

For most companies, having your blog fully integrated into your main website is the best option — for your visitors, for your SEO, and for your leadership positioning.  But there are some special cases where having  a separate blog is the right choice.

Use this analysis to choose the approach that best meets your goals.

Agree or disagree?  Did I miss anything?  Let me know in the comments below.

 

Be Sociable, Share!
 
The following two tabs change content below.
Andrew provides all-in-one internet marketing solutions for small business owners who want to stand out from the competition, attract targeted prospects, and convert them into customers.

69 Comments

  1. Thank you, this is very helpful. I think my next step will be to do some determining about the blog brand vs. my company brand – both of which are in the “consideration” phase right now. I look forward to keeping up with you!

    • Hi, Monique. I appreciate your comment. Does this mean you are keeping your blog separate from your website? If you wouldn’t mind sharing your particular reasons for that, other readers might find it helpful (and I’m interested, too).

      • Great stuff, Andrew. You tackled the exact issue I’ve been pondering. Blogs are so unattractive. I want our company brand / image to have a much different style / look. However, we survive off of our blog (i.e., the leads it generates). So I’m going to to integrate our blog because we still need the SEO.

  2. I just wanted to say thank you for your insight. I am new to all of this and was very up in the air about doing a blog. Thankfully you have put things into perspective for me. I now feel confident about adding a blog to my website!

    • Thank you for your comment, Becky. I wish you success with your new blog!

  3. Andrew:

    Currently I have two sites up. One for the my branded blog and a second company website. Content from the branded blog is posted to the company website as it is published. Company website has a archive section of published blogs. I’m concerned about SEO for both sites and if Google will lower my SERP.

    • Bailey — Thanks for your message.

      It sounds like you need to watch out for duplicate content issues. If Google finds two pages that are nearly identical in content, it won’t know which one to return in search results, and it will sometimes decide to return neither (Ouch!).

      One way you could avoid this would be by keeping the full blog post visible only on your blog site. When you post to the company website, post only introductory snippets. If someone clicks to “read more”, they will then be taken to the full post on your blog site.

      Of course, you could avoid these concerns altogether if you integrated your blog into your company website. Since you are re-posting all of your blog posts on your company website anyway, is there any reason you wouldn’t want to do this?

      Hope this helps.

      • Andrew:

        Thanks for your perspective. The reason for not posting directly to the corporate site is a philosophical one. I’m positioning myself as an expert in people-to-people marketing for the aviation industry through my blog. In order to do this I give away a lot of strategic and tactical advice. My experience with most blogs housed on a corporate site is that the reader can smell the sales pitch and therefore views the content with a wary eye.

        Currently the blog post acts as you describe in your second paragraph. The rub is that in order to achieve this the corporate site archives the entire article. Google search returns various SERP’s referencing either the blog site or the archived article.

        Thus the quandary.

        • Hi Bailey,

          Depending on your corporate site architecture, you might be able to tell Google to ignore the archived articles in your robots.txt file.

          Barring that, I’m not sure what to suggest. I understand your reasons for wanting a separate blog. Visitors to a business site do often initially assume any blog will be biased. But many business sites do successfully overcome that bias by publishing generously helpful content and not selling in their posts.

          I wish you luck.

  4. We have been doing the same thing as Bailey. For a long time we were posting our blogs on various websites in order to get more back links. Obviously this is frowned upon now and we have stopped. We have thousands of links to our site from duplicate content now. Would you recommend just deleting these old blogs and only keeping the blog on our site (the blog with the original content)? We lost some of our Google rankings, but are still #3-4 for a lot of our keywords. Do you think deleting all of the back links from the duplicate content will hurt us?

    • Hi, Mel. I appreciate your question.

      For everyone’s benefit, let me distinguish between guest posting and duplicate content posting. Posting a *unique* blog entry or article on a 3rd party site with links back to your site is a great way to earn honest back links and gain new traffic.

      It’s posting *duplicate* content that Google frowns upon, not just because Google may not know which version to return in search results, but because it doesn’t benefit anyone to have duplicate content filling up the web.

      However, if that’s already the situation you’re in, then the main question is what you asked — should you delete those duplicate posts? If you’re still ranking well for many keywords, then Google has not penalized your site for abuse. So those links themselves don’t hurt you, and some may still be helping your site’s SEO to some extent (just not as much as they used to).

      So I would answer the question by looking at search results. Google the key long-tail phrases from your duplicated posts. If none of your posts are anywhere to be found in the search results, then it’s likely that the duplicated content is a problem. Try deleting duplicates and see what happens. Start with a few blog posts and, if you see good results, do the rest.

      Also consider keeping some content on respected 3rd party sites and instead deleting the duplicate content from yours. You do want to keep some quality external links in the mix.

      Hope this helps!

      Best Regards,

      Andrew

  5. Great article that answered a lot of questions for me – thank you. This is a bit of a tangent, but hopefully not much – I have a Facebook page for my company and publish original content there. I am now thinking of moving everything to a blog. Will it affect my Google ranking if duplicate content appears on FB and my blog (I’m not sure how the search engines handle FB posts)? And, a follow-up – is there any real advantage from an SEO perspective to having a vibrant FB page…or should I focus on the blog?

    • Hi JD — thanks for the question.

      Blog posts are generally 300-1,000 words (or more). Facebook posts are generally much shorter. Are you really talking about complete content duplication?

      The best way to handle this would be to post a teaser on your Facebook page that links to your full blog post on your site. Then you get the social media exposure plus the benefits of a company blog.

      Either way, a dedicated blog post on your company website would almost certainly rank higher in search engines than a duplicate post on a Facebook page.

      As far as your website’s SEO is concerned, having a “vibrant FB page” won’t directly help. What really matters is whether people share your website pages (and blog posts) via their own social media sites. If your “vibrant FB page” successfully encourages that sort of sharing, then great. (Note: They’d need to share/like/tweet/+1 your blog post itself, not the FB post that points to your blog post.)

      Here’s an easy way to think about it. If a 3rd party links to your content, you win. If a 3rd party shares your content, you win. Those are signals to search engines that you’ve produced something of value. Having an active FB pages does not, by itself, say anything about the value of your company website’s content.

      I hope this is helpful. Best of luck to you!

      Andrew

      • Many thanks for taking the time and effort to respond. Yes, my FB posts are of the length of a normal blog post. Going forward, I am going to do exactly as you suggest – post to my website blog, and tease it on FB. My question at this point is, if I re-post the FB posts I’ve made over the past year on my website blog, will it affect my ranking because it’s duplicate content…another way of asking is, does Google and the other search engines count FB content the same as if it was duplicate content on another site/blog? Thank you so much for your advice and input!

        • Hi JD,

          I’m not sure how search engines would handle this precise situation in terms of deciding which content to return in search results. But I highly doubt that doing this would *hurt* your website’s rankings.

          Think of it this way. The “duplicate content penalty” is rarely a *penalty*. If you happen to have the same content at two different URLs then, worst case, the search engines aren’t sure which one is better to return in search results and may not return the one you prefer. But there’s no Google intern waiting around to hit a big red “Torpedo Website Rankings” button for a case like this. :-)

          It would be a different case if you’re intentionally creating duplicated or near-duplicated content on 100 different sites all over the web in the hopes of getting cheap links and traffic. Clear abuse like this can eventually get a site truly penalized by Google.

          I can’t, of course, guarantee how Google would look at your particular case, but I’d be quite surprised if they banned your site simply because of duplicated postings on your own Facebook site.

          One final suggestion. When you re-post your content to your blog spread them out over time. It’s far better to post regularly (1x/week, 1x/month) than to have 10 posts in October and nothing else until 2014. And, if possible, update and improve the posts as you release them. That’s not only great for your customers, but can also help reduce duplicate content concerns.

          Hope this helps.

          Andrew

  6. “If you link to the same internal page multiple times in a single blog post, make sure you optimize the first occurrence of that link. Typically, search engines will rely more heavily on the first instance of anchor text for a given link than subsequent instances. “

    • Hi, Ralph. That’s true. Thanks for sharing the tip.

  7. Hi Andrew,

    thanks for sharing your opinion about when to seperate and when to integrate your blog and website.

    I can see the advantages and disadvantages of integrating a blos into the website. I would love to hear your opinion about the following:

    Would it be benefical to integrate a blog into a clinical website? Since the pharma and medicine companies rely on trust and reputation, wouldnt it be a great chance to keep them seperated and strengthen the overall reputation and competences within a seperated more objective blog? Would you agree on that?

    Thanks again for the insightful post!
    Joerg

    • Hi Joerg,

      Thank you for your question.

      “Separate” does not necessarily mean “more objective”.

      You can write a very balanced blog directly on your business website and win appreciation from your readers for your candor and objectivity.

      Similarly, you’d have to earn a reputation for objectivity on any 3rd party blog site you create, which can be easily squandered if you’re perceived as favoring one particular business.

      So I’d tend to focus on reasons other than “perceived objectivity” for choosing a separate or integrated blog. While that might be a small plus for a separate blog, it’s hard to outweigh the benefits of an integrated blog for your own business.

      On the other hand, if you think you’d really be able to establish yourself as a prominent industry authority, wholly separate from your clinic, then I wouldn’t want to discourage you from setting up a separate blog to better enable that goal.

      Hope this is helpful,

      Andrew

  8. Hi Andrew,

    I really like your article. It is clear, thoughtful and, in my opinion, right-on. The only thing I would add is that sometimes companies need to separate the blog from the website due to technical constraints.

    For example, my e-commerce company has been running on a DNN site that was built in 2006 (yes, I know, we’ve grown organically so… the site is what it is) until, like, today, when we switch to a new Drupal platform.

    All I ever wanted was /blog however the old site, for a variety of reasons, simply didn’t permit that. So our SEO-friendly workaround was to build a WordPress site with the blog. prefix.

    Now that we’re moving to the Drupal platform we can finally bring the blog under the URL as /blog.

    Great article! Do you have much experience with multilingual ecommerce sites / SEO?

    Erica

    • Hi Erica — Thank you for your comments.

      Yes, there are often historical reasons for the way things are. Glad you hear you guys are moving on to Drupal. I’m sure you’ll love it much better all around, for the blog and more.

      As far as multilingual sites — Yes, I’m building one right now, actually. It’s an SEO-optimized Japanese / English site for a client in Tokyo.

      If you’d like to talk more, feel free to send me a message/email at the Contact link above.

      Best Regards,

      Andrew

  9. Hi Andrew,

    Thank your helpful and interesting article.
    I was hesitating so far, but i think i’ll go for an integrated blog.
    The only problem is the blog design, it’ll be a little hard to customize the templates so they will look the same as main website design!
    Do you have any suggestions regarding which blog is better: wordpress, blogger, overblog, … ?

    Regards,
    Reda

    • Hi Reda,

      You can style a different template to look the same as the main website, though it could take a good deal of work. But there are so many sites where the blog doesn’t match the main site styling, that I don’t think most people care, or even notice. Did you notice or care that my blog looks different from my main site?

      I’ve only used WordPress and Joomla for blogs, so I can’t comment on the other ones you mentioned. I can tell you that I’ve seen no reason to ever leave WordPress.

      I wish you luck!

      Andrew

  10. I agree with each and every conclusion made on this topic. It is really very informative. Thanks for sharing.

  11. Hi Andrew,
    Here’s an exact quote from our web developer when I asked your exact topic: “I would recommend getting a blog on a separate hosting account. Why? Because if you host it on the same server and your blog gets hacked, which is happening more and more these days, you will not risk affecting your main website that brings in your new students. So, you can set up a simple WordPress or Blogger blog yourself and simply link to it”

    We’ve never experienced hacking and we use PayPal for customer purchases. Should I be worried about hacking to the point of using a blogging host?

    • Hi, Sam. Great question. First off, it sounds like you are wisely NOT storing customer credit card info on your server, instead using PayPal. So unless you’re storing other highly sensitive customer data, damage from potential hacking should be limited.

      Second, any website can be hacked, and blogs are as secure as you want them to be. WordPress comes with many security plugins you can optionally use. To be extra safe you can have an expert edit your .htaccess file and configure your server for additional security.

      Sure, hacking is always a risk, but you have to decide if incrementally higher security is worth the cost of less effective SEO and a less coherent user experience.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Andrew

  12. Hi Andrew,
    Thanks for the article – interesting perspective on where to host. I’ve tried the blog subdomain and /blog approach and have to say that, at first blush, moving to the sub-domain approach from /blog resulted in a drop in organic traffic but with the (not set) chaos thanks to Google it’s a little trickier to pinpoint these days!

    Adam

    • Hi Adam — Thanks for your comment.

      Any move like that (in either direction) is likely to result in a short-term drop in organic traffic while the search engines fully update their indices. And of course it’s essential to do 301 redirects so the links don’t get lost.

      But the million dollar question is — does the traffic come back stronger after the dust settles? I’d advocate the /blog approach in general, but there may still be some special cases where using the subdomain could provide a better long-term result. It does need to be considered on a case by case basis.

      Yes, isn’t Google’s massive increase in “(not set)” and “(not provided)” data ever so helpful?

      Andrew

  13. Hi Andrew,

    We are wanting to start a blog using WordPress on our existing domain and were wondering about the WordPress options – WordPress.com and WordPress.org. From what I read, WordPress.org is the way to go if we want to drive traffic to our site for SEO value so that we can use our existing domain but our IT department is worried about constantly having to update with this option. Do you know of another solution which helps retain SEO value, allows for a new blog to be added to an existing site and limits the upgrades needed by IT?

    • Hi Kelli,

      Thank you for your question. Any business that wants a serious web presence needs their own domain. So, yes, you would not want to use WordPress.com (for that reason among others).

      The free open-source download from WordPress.org gives you full control and full flexibility over your site. It is the simplest CMS (Content Management System) in the world to set up and maintain. If you have an IT department, updating the software of a a WP website is something they should be able to do during one coffee break a month (or quarter).

      I would need to understand your business to make more specific recommendations. Feel free to click the Contact button at the top-right of the page and send me a message.

      Good luck!

      Andrew

  14. Hi Andrew,

    Thanks for the article.

    I have a website set up offering services and online program, however I am currently working out legalities with lawyers to make sure I not breaking any laws in my profession and currently doing some further product testing before driving people to this website.

    In the meantime I want to be driving traffic to blog posts and building a subscriber list as soon as possible, so I am not wasting any time, however I dont want people to be seeing my services/products just yet.

    I feel my options for driving traffic to blogs and building a subscriber list now are:
    A)I build a new blog website on a new domain and drive people here and then when the above are sorted redirect this page to my initial site.. Or,
    B) If possible, hide current pages on my initial site/domain and just leave the blog page and a few others unhidden for viewing and when the above is sorted open up all of the pages.

    What would you recommend?

    Hope that made sense.

    Thanks

    Michael

    • Hi Michael — I appreciate your question.

      Either approach would work fine for what you want to accomplish. I would go with (B) just because dealing with a single site is easier to manage, and you’ll be able to bring everything live more quickly once you’re ready.

      Good luck with it!

      Andrew

      • Awesome..

        I went with Option B, getting everything sorted now.

        Thanks for your help Andrew

  15. Great article! I’m desperate to integrate our blog and website on the same server… but unfortunately just found out our Windows server won’t host our WordPress blog. After reading your points, I’m even more convinced it needs to happen! Are you aware of any blogs that can be hosted on a Windows server or do you recommend us biting the bullet and switching to a PHP server? Thanks

    • Hi Melinda — Thanks for your question.

      I’m afraid I have no experience with Windows servers. The web developers I’ve worked with over the years wouldn’t touch them. Linux (PHP) servers are the worldwide standard for flexibility and reliability. I’m sure there are blogs that will run on Windows servers, but I unfortunately don’t know what they would be.

      I wish you luck in getting your blog up and running!

      Andrew

    • Hi Melinda

      It might depend specifically on your windows server – because this looks like WordpPress might run on windows:
      http://www.microsoft.com/web/wordpress.

      That being said I know Joomla! can be run up on a windows server (I use Joomla for my blog).

  16. Thanks for the very informative article. My question is this: I am a chiropractor and my clinic domain will contain the word chiropractic and the city I am located in so that I can optimize SEO that way. My thought process for wanting to separate my blog is that I want my blog to be widely visible and relevant not just to the city. I want to establish myself as an expert in nutrition and wellness, and so will not be blogging just about chiropractic. Will it hurt my SEO if I just have the first 50 words of my blog posts on my website but then link out to my separate blog?

    • Hi Stephanie — Thanks for your question.

      It’s hard to know Google’s exact word count threshold for “duplicate content confusion”. But posting a snippet that links to a full post is a very common practice so shouldn’t be a problem.

      However, keep in mind that most of the SEO value you’ll be creating from this blog content will be helping your blog site (where the full posts exist) rather than your clinic site.

      Best of luck to you!

      Andrew

  17. This is a great article. We have been doing this with our client sites and it has worked great for SEO purposes. Thanks for sharing.

  18. Hi Andrew
    Many thanks for your interesting and informative article. I am a newbie who is about to start a blog and then in the future an e-commerce business. My thinking was to grow the blog first and then to somehow incorporate it into the e-commerce site when it is up and running. My hope and intention was that the blog would help to improve the seo of the e-commerce business and that any blog followers might then be attracted to browse the e-commerce site from the blog. If I use a simple blogging platform like Google’s Blogger would it be possible to incorporate it onto an e-commerce site later that had been created using something like ‘Shopify’ ? Would the blog then benefit the seo of the e-commerce site or does the blog have to be an integral feature of the e-commerce platform in order for it to provide seo benefits in this way ?

    • Hi Amanda,

      There are two main pieces you’ll need to think about.

      1) Domain

      If you’re building the SEO authority of a blog located at MyCoolBlog.com, then that is the primary domain that will benefit. So if you want to plan for eventual integration as you describe, with your ecommerce site leveraging the SEO benefits, you may want to begin with having the blog located at MyEcommerceSite.com/blog. You can set this up even if the Ecommerce site and the blog are built on entirely different platforms.

      2) Internal linking

      The other way to have your blog benefit the SEO of your ecommerce site is to link from your blog posts to your ecommerce site pages. You can do that regardless of the domains where they exist.

      I hope that helps?

      Andrew

      • Many thanks for your help!

  19. Andrew, very interesting post – thx!

    What do you think about this?
    We have a very specialized consulting business and positioned ourselves as experts – with a blog.
    We have as well a quite low profile website on a separate domain which we are updating in near future. I’d like to integrate the blog in the website, but the blog has much more traffic than the website.

    I think we could still link on the blog sites (under its “old name” as an headline, as landing pages) to gather all the blog interested people. But what about the old valuable links on the blog posts? Will we loose them and does this hurt our ranking?

    What would be your approach?

    • Hi Sabine — Thanks for your question.

      You certainly don’t want to lose all those valuable links from 3rd party sites pointing to your various blog posts. Those are important “votes of authority” in Google’s eyes for SEO purposes.

      What you need to do, when you’re ready to migrate the blog to your new site, is set up “301 redirects” so that anyone clicking on an old URL will be brought to the same blog post at its new URL. Google sees those as “permanent URL moves” and continues to give you full credit for the old links.

      Setting up 301 redirects can be a bit tricky and the process varies by platform. I’d suggest working with a knowledgeable developer to implement it for you.

      Hope this helps.

      Andrew

      • Thx a lot for your advice!

  20. Just wanted to say that this article and the detailed answers to people’s questions were incredibly helpful to me! We are planning to import a client’s external blog articles into their main site, but I had concerns about what would happen to their SEO and the old links. Your suggestion for a 301 redirect is exactly the solution I was looking for. Thanks so much!

  21. Very good answers to everyone’s questions… so thanks for doing this.

    We have a website http://www.buildingperformanceservices.com that works perfectly. When customers go on it, we almost always get the work… so that part is cool. It was built in iWeb and I am getting ready to convert it to Easyweb and want to start a blog. It is clear from your previous answers that having the blog be part of the web site is the way to go.

    Here is my problem… we are insulation contractor and the the word “insulation” is nowhere to be found. I recently bought insulationgeek.com thinking it would be a great name for a blog about insulation. My real question is… is there a way to use insulation geek.com to link to my buildingperformanceservices.com/blog page?

    • I love all the creative questions. Keep them coming, guys! :-)

      If you will have your main site and your blog both at the buildingperformanceservices.com domain, then there is no value in pointing a brand new domain with no SEO authority at your blog. You would need to put in effort to build SEO authority for the new domain, and that effort is usually much better spent on your main domain.

      What you could do is call your blog “The Insulation Geek”, or something similar, and make the URL be: buildingperformanceservices.com/insulation-geek-blog. This then gets the keyword “insulation” into your page title, page header (h1 tag) and in the URL, each of which will contribute some small SEO boost.

      Hope that helps!

      Andrew

  22. We have a blog that has been around since around 2010 on Blogger. We just recently converted our site to WordPress. Is there a way to merge blogger post into our new site? Do we leave blogger up and start a blog on the WordPress site? Will Blogger not being updated hurt us? I really want to utilize the authorship features of Google because we are experts in our field and what to share that knowledge.
    Thanks for the great information. I agree that the blog being on the site is important. We also have a press page, should that page also be the blog? I know a lot of questions.

    • Hi, Meghan. I’m not very familiar with Blogger, I’m afraid. There may be tools that will import Blogger posts into WordPress. I’d try Googling.

      I wouldn’t maintain two different company blogs unless they are on very different topics. So I’d find some way to move the old posts over to WordPress.

      You can easily apply Google Authorship markup to a WordPress blog, so that’s not a concern.

      I would keep press on a regular WordPress page. A valuable blog is all about the customer. Press is all about the company. I wouldn’t muddy them together.

      Hope this is helpful.

      Andrew

      • HI Andrew,

        I’m setting up a new fashion website and I had been told I should have the blog on an external platform for SEO purposes which it sounds like from your article is not the case. Is there a benefit in having both – so an internal website blog to build up SEO and strength of our website and a different blog on Tumblr for example with different content, perhaps more visual, that is more like an extra social media site and might help drive traffic to our main website? Thanks! Naomi

        • Hi, Naomi. Having an *additional* blog (or any other content source) separate from your website that can capture additional traffic and bring new visitors to your main website could of course be a very good thing.

          My main concern would be whether you have the bandwidth. If you need to spend time, energy and money on this additional blog, will your main website and blog suffer as a result? If so, it may not be a good tradeoff overall for your business.

          But if Tumblr is where you believe your best customers can be found, then it might be worth splitting your attention.

          I’m sorry that I don’t have a clear cut answer. It really depends on where you believe you can best reach new customers and on your available resources.

          Andrew

  23. Thanks for the info! I am currently a FT graphic designer – wannabe freelance designer SAHM with my three little ones. I would like to ideally incorporate my design business with a humorous really life blog/design inspiration & projects. That’s my life, so why not share. My issue – I have 2 domain names that I LOVE. One plain ole one for my design business, and one for the mommy blog. Do I make 2 different websites or combine? And how can I use both domains if I do combine? Can the blog link go to a different URL? Thanks!

    • Hi, Lisa. Great questions. First, keep in mind that creating, refining and maintaining two websites can be twice as much work (or more). A lot of things are simpler with a single site.

      Plus, the personality and humor that it sounds like would come through your blog could be a great way to make your business site more unique and more approachable at the same time.

      If you do a single site, there’s no great way to use both domain names. You’ll have to choose. Yes, you can redirect one to the other, but that’s really of little value.

      If you decide to keep the sites separate, yes — you can certain place a “blog” link on your business site that goes to your second domain.

      Hope this helps!

      Andrew

  24. Andrew, thanks for the tips. I’m a new fan! The small business I work for wants a blog for various reasons (including SEO and to grow the site content). The boss wants the blog posts to double as website pages, but the writing style and content are not a direct fit. My ideal would be to create independent pages for the website, then write blog entries (still on the same domain) with links back to the web pages (allowing more flexible blog content). From an SEO perspective, are there advantages to this?

    • Wendy — Tell your boss you have the right plan. :-)

      People have different expectations for blog posts vs. static site pages. If you try to blur the line, it will just lead to unnecessary confusion.

      From an SEO perspective it doesn’t matter too much (content is content, links are links) except that properly configured blogs will auto-notify web services (including search engines) each time you post, which helps visibility. Plus most blog-writing platforms (like WordPress) help optimize the content for SEO.

      But from a visitor perspective, this content distinction is important. Keep all your blogs posts organized under a clear “Blog” menu item. Your static site pages, on the other hand, should be architected and organized to best meet your online business objectives (product sales, lead generation, etc.).

      • Thanks Andrew – your prompt reply and advice is much appreciated.

  25. I would just like to share my reason for separating my blog from my website because I pondered about this forever. I chose the middle ground of adding a link on my page after reading this post. I have an author page, but it is solely for my children’s book series about fruits & vegetables and my food illustrations. I have a blog connected to it, but I list it as “Resources” on my nav bar because I only post information and resources pertaining to children’s health & nutrition and any educational materials related to my book.

    My personal blog is listed as “blog” on my nav bar. Although, it is related to my art and life, it has a different tone of writing I probably could have combined it, but my desired layout wouldn’t have been possible. I would also like to monetize it and add a shop in the future, and the idea of advertising with affiliated links on my author page bothers me.

    It is a lot of work, but I’m finally getting the hang of it.

    Thank you for your insight!

    • Very nice! I’m glad to hear this approach is working for you.

  26. I am considering adding a blog of articles for photographer resources, but I already have a blog to showcase my photography sessions.
    Would it be beneficial to have a separate blog for my photographer following? My whole
    Point of writing any articles would be solely for SEO purposes and to be seen as a thought leader as you stated.

    Also, I am wordpress.com. Is that a bad choice as a business? I have my own domain name.

    Should I have gone with WordPress.org and if I wanted to switch would that be SEO suicide?

    I just want the best shot at SEO and traffic and growth.

    • Hi Jasmin – Great questions.

      If the second blog is targeting a different market (professional photographers vs. consumers), then a separate blog is the best idea. If you combine all content in a single blog, each audience could find the postings irrelevant half the time. Not good.

      However, if your goal is to accrue SEO benefits, then you’d need the second blog to exist on your main website, too. There are ways to do this with WordPress (WordPress.org full installation), but I’m not sure if you can do that with a WordPress.com account. You’d have to check with them.

      WordPress.com isn’t necessarily a bad choice. It makes running the site easier for anyone not familiar with setting up websites. But it does limit your flexibility (access to far fewer plugins).

      If you wanted to switch from WordPress.com to your own fully-hosted WordPress installation, it can be done without the search engines ever knowing. You just need to maintain the same URLs for all the pages.

      Good luck with whatever you decide, and keep in mind that the most important element for building authority isn’t SEO-this or fancy-that. It’s the ability to produce insightful, truly valuable content for your market.

  27. Great post! Quick question that I haven’t seen addressed yet…

    Let’s say a company, mikespizza.com, publishes their blog URL as mikespizza.com/blog. However, when a user goes to that link it 301 redirects to mikespizza.tumblr.com. From an SEO perspective, is the value the same as if the blog were actually hosted at /blog?

    • Hi Michael – Thanks for your question.

      If you’re asking if mikespizza.com/blog will get SEO value in this case, the answer is “no”. A 301 redirect from URL A to URL B tells search engines to completely ignore URL A and give all SEO credit to URL B. It’s as if URL A doesn’t exist.

      So, for any inbound links pointing at mikespizza.com/blog, mikespizza.com will get no SEO value while mikespizza.tumblr.com gets all the SEO value.

      Hope that helps.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Are Monthly SEO Services Right for Your Business? - […] and promoting fresh, valuable content — blogs, articles, white papers, e-books, press releases, videos, […]
  2. Have a blog? Make sure it's integrated with your website and domain name! | Sleepless Media Blog - Web Design and Development - […] will directly contribute to your website’s SEO strength. This is because the content and the backlinks are directed at …
  3. Need a blog on your e-Commerce site? You’re in luck, Shopify has that built right in. | Sleepless Media Blog - Web Design and Development - […] your blog and ecommerce site all on Shopify, links to your posts will directly increase your site’s SEO strength. …
  4. How a Blog Can Grow Your Business - […] published this post in August: “Should You Separate Your Blog from Your Website?” thinking it would have rather niche …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

CommentLuv badge